Ian Britza, new WA State Member for Morley

From Ian Britza’s recent maiden speech in the WA Legislative Assembly (note the reference to Israel):

…When I won the seat of Morley, I knew that the people did not know me and the vote was primarily against the previous government….they did not know where I came from, what I was like, what I believe, and probably hoped that, at least, I stood for Liberal Party policies, which I do.

What are my principles, ethics and personal beliefs? My parents, the Reverend Bill and Beryl Britza, were missionaries for just on 20 years in Malawi, Africa….

…I also share with the house my unashamed support and love for the nation of Israel. I have visited this nation, and my heart is tender towards its people. History has shown time and again that whoever supports and honours this nation truly becomes prosperous, flourishes and increases in influence. Therefore, I publicly declare my support for and loyalty to this nation.

…I have a natural love, admiration and deep respect and honour for the United States of America. I am well aware of this nation’s real and perceived failures, but it stands on its own in the world as a nation whose people stand for what is right and have a deep-seated heart for and belief in democracy, freedom and justice. Whether or not we support the United States of America, it is a sobering thought to consider that no-one thinks to invade us because of our excellent alliance with this nation, whose own armed forces have also given their lives for our nation’s freedom….

In the light of the fact that I have been a minister of the church for nearly 30 years, I understand how many people would immediately, without much thought, put me into a particular religious box. … I am not ashamed of the foundational spiritual principles that were given to me by my parents. They not only gave me sound spiritual guidance for my future welfare and personal benefit; they also instilled in me a sense of right…

… It is quite simple really. Every civilisation that has lost its compass where morals are concerned has simply slipped into history and its people have always played an extremely high price for it. Just because we live in the twenty-first century does not mean that the consequences of the past will not come to us.

Morality is an interesting thing… Just because something is legal does not make it right, and just because a bill is presented and is passed by a majority does not mean that it is right. Just because abortion is legal does not make it right. When a woman who is pro-choice wants a child she calls it a baby, and when she does not want it she calls it a foetus. It may be legal but it is not right.

This brings me to my final point. While obviously holding on to sound biblical, Judaeo-Christian beliefs and principles, I simply ask whether the decision before me is right. Situational ethics is a dangerous path to walk when there are no absolutes to guide oneself in making decisions that affect hundreds and thousands of people. When listening to bills being presented in this chamber, I will be constantly asking myself whether they are right or wrong. I will make decisions based on moral absolutes, because they are not persuaded by how we personally think or feel about a matter. Two plus two will always be four. Even if we do not like it or are angry and frustrated by it, the answer will always be four, and moral judgements are the same. People can say whatever they like, believe whatever they want to believe, and act however they want to act, but moral absolutes simply remain the same.

I conclude with a statement that will be my guiding rule in my term as member for Morley and in this house: it is easy to do justice, but very difficult to do right, therefore let right be done. I thank members of this house for the friendship and goodwill extended to me and I humbly express the honour I feel to be a part of this chamber and to serve the people of Western Australia, the people of Morley, the Premier, his ministers and the members of this chamber.

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