Ken Arkwright Exposed Again

Last week JewglePerth asked:  Is the Perth Jewish community prepared to tolerate intellectual dishonesty?  The answer, unfortunately, appears to be that it will.

It seems hard to believe, but a week after the Maccabean was made aware of plagiarism by Ken Arkwright, not only have they failed to acknowledge an exposed breach of journalistic ethics, not only have they failed to suspend their correspondent in the face of untenable circumstances, not only have they published another “Did you Know” column, not only is the column once again reproducing material from a website without referencing it, but that website once again happens to be Wikipedia!

Approximately 80% of the text in the article published this week is lifted from Wikipedia, as referenced below.  There is no link in the Maccabean item to the source, and once again, the reader is under the impression that this is the intellectual creation and scholarly research of Mr Ken Arkwright.

For the Wikipedia item please visit

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gl%C3%BCckel_of_Hameln

Maccabean Column:

Gluckel of Hamelin, whose Hebrew name was Glikl bat Judah Leib, was born in 1646 in Hamburg, and she died in 1724 in Metz, Alsace-Loraine. She became a Jewish businesswomen centuries before the Women’s Liberation Movement.  She wrote in Judeo-German, the forerunner to Yiddish.  The first part of her written legacy is a Living Will that was intended to guide her descendants to live ethical lives. 

Wikipedia:

Glückel of Hameln (also spelled Gluckel or Glikl of Hamelin; also known as Glikl bas Judah Leib) (1646, Hamburg – September 19, 1724, Metz) was a Jewish businesswoman and diarist…… Written in Yiddish, her diaries were originally intended for her descendants. The first part is actually a living will urging them to live ethical lives.

 

Maccabean Column

Historians discovered much later the Glukel diaries, and they started to appreciate her account of life at that time.  Glukel and her husband Chaim lived in Hamburg.  Chaim was an affluent Hamburg businessman and Glukel was already involved in his business during his lifetime. Chaim died in 1689, when she took over the business.  She traded with businesses in Vienna, Paris, Berlin, Leipzig and Metz.

Wikipedia:

It was only much later that historians discovered the diaries and began to appreciate her account of life at that time. Glückel lived in the city of Hamburg, where her husband Haim was an affluent businessman. Already involved in his business during his lifetime, when he died in 1689, she took over the business, conducting trade with markets as far as Amsterdam, Leipzig, Berlin, Vienna, Metz and Paris.

 

Maccabean Item

She remarried Cerf Levy, a banker from Metz in Lorriane, and moved to live there in 1700.  Levy went bankrupt in 1702 losing his and her fortune.  He died in 1712, leaving her a widow for a second time.   She begins her diaries in 1689, continued writing until 1699, and later resumed the writing between 1715, and 1719.  These diaries predate modern Yiddish literature, and they were written by a women, which was a rarity for Jewish texts from that period.  The diaries deal with world and Jewish history, and they cover the controversies surrounding the false messiah Shabbetai Tzevi, the day-to-day life of Jewish inhabitants of the Rhine valley and the consequences of the Swedish wars fought by King Charles XII. 

Wikipedia

In 1700 she remarried, to a banker from Metz in Lorraine, and relocated there. Two years later, her husband Cerf Levy failed financially, losing not only his own fortune but hers as well. He died in 1712, leaving her a widow for a second time. In her diaries, begun after her first husband’s death in 1689, she describes key events in both Jewish and world history, such as the messianic fervor surrounding Sabbatai Zevi or the impact of the Swedish wars waged by King Charles XII. At the same time, she also describes day-to-day life among the Jewish inhabitants of the Rhine valley. Other scholars point to the fact that they constitute an early document in Yiddish, predating the rise of modern Yiddish literature, while still others note that they were written by a woman, a rarity for Jewish texts from that period.

 

Maccabean Item

Glukel’s twelve children by her first husband married into the most prominent Jewish families of Europe.  They include:  Hendrick, Heine, Samson Raphael Hirsch, and many more.  The handwritten manuscripts of her Ethical Will and her Diaries were kept my Glukel’s children and grandchildren. 

Wikipedia

Glückel’s twelve children by her first husband married into the most prominent Jewish families of Europe……They include such figures as Heinrich Heine, Samson Raphael Hirsch, Daphne Merkin, Joseph, Mordechai and Isaac Breuer, Ursula and J. Ezra Merkin, Salomon Heine and Bertha Pappenheim (also known as Anna O.)……. The handwritten manuscript of Glückel’s diaries was kept by Glückel’s children and grandchildren.

 

Maccabean Item

Recent German and English publications of these memoirs are:  “Die Memoiren der Glückel von Hameln   Beltz Verlag, 2005. The Life of Glückel of Hameln 1646-1724, written by herself.” Horovitz Publ. Co. London 1965.

Wikipedia

Bibliography – “Die Memoiren der Glückel von Hameln” Aus dem Jüdisch-Deutschen von Bertha Pappenheim (Autorisierte Übertragung nach der Ausgabe von Prof. Dr. David Kaufmann, Wien 1910). Mit einem Vorwort von Viola Roggenkamp. Weinheim und Basel: Beltz Verlag, 2005. ……..

 The Life of Glückel of Hameln 1646-1724, written by herself. Translated from the original Yiddish and edited by Beth-Zion Abrahams, Yoselof 1963 (1962 Horovitz Publ. Co., London).

  

Now the Maccabean article changes subject and talks about Jacob Emden.  You will need to go to the page to reference the plagiarism in this part of the article    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Emden

Maccabean:

The other Hamburg diarist was Jacob Emden who wrote “Megillath Sefer” containing his and his father’s biography.  Emden was a Rabbi, a Talmudist and a prominent opponent of the Sabbetaians.  He was born in Altona/Hamburg in 1697 and died there in 1776.  He was the son of Tzevi Hirsch ben Yaakov Ashkenasi (1656 – 1718) and the great great grandson of Elijah ben Yudah of Chelm, Baal Shem (1514 – 1583). 

Wikipedia:

Jacob Emden was a rabbi and notable talmudist, and prominent opponent of the Sabbateans. He was born at Altona June 4, 1697, and died there April 19, 1776. He was the son of the Chacham Tzvi, and a great-great grandson of Elijah Ba’al Shem of Chelm…….His Works:   Megillat Sefer, containing biographies of himself and of his father.

 

Maccabean Article:

Emden studied Talmud under his father’s guidance.  He was the formost Talmudic authority of that age.  In 1715 he married the daughter of Mordechai ben Naphtali Kohen, Rabbi of Ungarish-Brod, in Moravia.      

Wikipedia: 

Until seventeen Emden studied Talmud under his father Rabbi Tzvi Ashkenazi, the foremost Talmudic authority of the age, first at Altona, then from 1710 to 1714 at Amsterdam. In 1715 Emden married the daughter of Mordecai ben Naphtali Kohen, rabbi of Uhersky Brod, Moravia, and continued his studies in his father-in-law’s yeshivah.

 

Maccabean Article:

Emden became well versed in Talmudic literature. He also studied grammar, philosophy, Latin, Dutch and Kabbalah.  This required from him a superhuman effort, as he believed that a Jew should only occupy himself with secular sciences during the hours of twilight.  The Tanach Joshua 1:8 reads “…you shall mediate therein (torah) day and night”.  Emden interpreted this passage that a truly observant Jew can study secular subjects only in the twilight hours, as days and nights are reserved for Torah study.

Wikipedia: 

Emden became well versed in Talmudic literature; later he studied philosophy, Kabbalah, and grammar, and made an effort to acquire the Latin and Dutch languages, in which, however, he was seriously hindered by his belief that a Jew should occupy himself with secular sciences only during the hour of twilight. This belief stems from the biblical verse (Josh. I, 8): “You will study [the Torah] day and night”, leaving room for secular studies during hours, which are neither truly day nor truly night.

 

Maccabean Article:

He was opposed to the teachings of philosophy, and maintained that “the Guide to the Perplexed” could not have been written by Maimonidies, because a pious Jew could never write a book that responded to “non-Jewish theology”.   Emden spent three years at Ungarish-brod, where he held the office of private lecturer in Talmud.  Thereafter he became a jewellery merchant, which required him to travel and to decline Rabbinic appointments. However, in 1728, he accepted the Rabbinate in the City of Emden from which he took his surname. 

Wikipedia:

He was opposed to philosophy, and maintained that The Guide to the Perplexed could not have been written by Maimonides, as he could not imagine that a pious Jew would write a work accepting and promoting what Emden saw as a non-Jewish theology.  Emden spent three years at Ungarish-Brod, where he held the office of private lecturer in Talmud. Then be became a dealer in jewelry and other articles, which occupation compelled him to travel. He generally declined to accept the office of rabbi, though in 1728 he was induced to accept the rabbinate of Emden, from which place he took his name.

Maccabean Article:

In 1733, Emden returned to Hamburg/Altona and there he obtained the permission of the Jewish community to establish his private Synagogue and from the King of Denmark to establish a printing press.  He was soon attacked for publishing a prayer book called Amudei Shamayim (Pillars of Heaven) that did not conform to the official prayer book approved by the chief Rabbi of the German community Ezekiel Katzenellenbogen. 

Wikipedia:

In 1733 Emden returned to Altona, where he obtained the permission of the Jewish community to possess a private synagogue. ….. His relations with Ezekiel Katzenellenbogen, the chief rabbi of the German community, were strained from the very beginning……A few years later Emden obtained from the King of Denmark the privilege of establishing at Altona a printing-press. He was soon attacked for his publication of the siddur (prayer book) Ammudei Shamayim, being accused of having dealt arbitrarily with the text.

 

Maccabean Article:

Emden’s opinions were very unconventional and yet he was extremely Orthodox.  He believed that the ban on polygamy by Rabbenu Gershom (965-1028) was a serious mistake because it replaced Jewish with Christian ethics. 

Wikipedia:

Emden’s opinions were often extremely unconventional. …… He believed that the ban on polygamy by Rabbeinu Gershom was a serious mistake in that it followed Christian morals; although, he states, he does not have the power to urge the ban to be repealed.

 

Maccabean Article:

In the Sabbath eve section of this prayerbook, he gave details how the mitzvah of sexual intercourse is to be consummated between husband and wife.  He never deviated from tradition and after a careful study of the Zohar he concluded that a great part of the Zohar was the product an imposter.  Yet Emden taught that Christianity has an important role to play in God’s plan for mankind and he had friendly relations with Christian scholars.  Emden considered that the New Testament contains part of Jewish tradition for the benefit of Christians.  

Wikipedia:

Emden has been criticized for his interest in sexual matters but while it is true that, for instance, he provides, in his Siddur, details of how the marital act is to be carried out, this is in the context of the Shabbat eve section of the Prayer Book which, for the Kabbalists, is the occasion for sexual congress between husband and wife in order to repeat and assist the union on high between the male and female principles in the Godhead….. Emden believed that Christianity has an important role to play in God’s plan for mankind and was on friendly relations with a number of Christian scholars…… From Emden’s perspective, the New Testament appropriates parts of Jewish tradition, such as B’nei Noah and Proselyte, to the benefit of Christians, see also Council of Jerusalem.

 

Maccabean article:

In 1772, the Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin issued a decree forbidding burial on the day of death.  The Jews in his community asked Emden to demonstrate from the Talmud that a longer exposure of a corpse would be against Jewish law.  Emden referred them to Moses Mendelssohn, who had great influence with Christian authorities.  However, Mendelssohn agreed with the ducal order.

Wikipedia:

In 1772 the Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin having issued a decree forbidding burial on the day of death, the Jews in his territories approached Emden with the request that he demonstrate from the Talmud that a longer exposure of a corpse would be against the Law. Emden referred them to Mendelssohn, who had great influence with Christian authorities; but as Mendelssohn agreed with the ducal order,

 

Maccabean Article:

Emden fought a lifelong battle against Jonathan Eybeschutz, who in Emden’s eyes was a committed Sabbetaian (follower of the false Messiah Shabbetai Tzevi).  The Emden-Eybeschutz controversy lasted several years and turned nasty.  In Megillath Sefer, Emdin accuses Eybeshutz of having an incestuous relationship with his own daughter and of fathering a child with her.  Many friends of Eybeschutz retaliated, and Emden’s life seemed to be in danger.  So he left Altona and took refuge in Amsterdam (May 1751).

Wikipedia:

Of these controversies the most prominent was that with Jonathan Eybeschütz, who in Emden’s eyes was a convicted Shabbethaian. The controversy lasted several years, continuing even after Eybeschütz’s death……  In Megillat Sefer, he even accuses Eybeschütz of having an incestuous relationship with his own daughter, and of fathering a child with her…..  The majority of the community favored Eybeschütz….. His life seeming to be in actual danger, he left the town and took refuge in Amsterdam (May 1751).

 

Maccabean Item:

The court of Frederick V of Denmark decided on 3 June 1752 in favour of Emden fining his opponents 100 thalers. Consequently, Emden returned to Altona and took possession of his Synagogue and printing press.  However he was forbidden to continue his agitation against Eybechutz. 

Wikipedia:

Emden’s cause was subsequently taken up by the court of Frederick V of Denmark, and on June 3, 1752, a judgment was given in favor of Emden, severely censuring the council of the three communities and condemning them to a fine of one hundred thalers. Emden then returned to Altona and took possession of his synagogue and printing-establishment, though he was forbidden to continue his agitation against Eybeschütz.

 

Maccabean Item:

Christians wear a crucifix around their neck for Jesus to protect them from evil sprits and the devil.  Jews copied this custom by wearing Magen David’s, minature Mesusoth and many other forms of devil scarers.  It was against such superstition that Emden fought his battles.  Many of his contemporary Rabbis made money out of writing suitable magic formuli for these charms.  No wonder that these charlatan Rabbi’s disliked Emden to the extent that he had to fear for his life. 

We are now back again in the dark middle ages, and a large industry of Jewish charm-Jewellery has surfaced supported by Rabbis who will teach you which text in the charm is kosher and will protect you from the evil spirit and which is not.  Emden would turn in his grave if he were aware of some of the spiritual and intellectual decay of Judaism in our time. 

Wikipedia:  ?????

Actually, this section of text above is not taken from the Wikipedia post about Emden!  Therefore, it could be assumed that it is the intellectual creation of Mr Ken Arkwright.  Of course the tone of these above paragraphs is derogatory towards Judaism, as is often the case with Mr Arkwrights editorial stance. 

 

Once again, JewglePerth calls on the Maccabean to recognise the ethical breach that has occured and to appropriately act.

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